You Tube allows rights holders to ‘monetize’ mashups and fan videos

An interesting post on the Google blog discusses the latest in a seemingly unending line of 'synchronised dancing at your wedding' videos. Personally speaking, I'm a little tired of this particular meme, however, the video racked up over 10 million YouTube views in a few days, so I'm probably in the minority. Which is all very well, but what's interesting, however, is that You Tube now lets the rights holders, in this case Chris Brown's record company, monetize the video, i.e. serve ads over the video to Amazon downloads, etc. But does it work? Well according to Google it does. "In the ...

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Metacafe’s wiki strategy

Metacafe bets on the power of wikis. This is an interesting response to the increasing market dominance of YouTube, and though I hesitate to bringing up splogging, the cynic in me feels that Metacafe's move has quite a lot to do with boosting their results in Google.

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Michael Wesch talks about YouTube

Michael Wesch talks about YouTube at the Library of Congress. Take home points: 1. In the last 6 months YouTube users have uploaded as much content (UGC that is) as all the US TV networks have created since their inception (over 1.5 million hours of content). 2. Much of the content gets less than 100 views. 3. Numa Numa. via Punk Planning

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Tubemogul – the top 40 online video producers

Tubemogul, an online video distribution and analytics company, has just released a list of the top 40 online video producers. And while it's early days for this particular medium, and this chart isn't definitive, I think that the fact Chris Pirillo ranks above CBS says some significant about how YouTube is changing the game.

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April’s video traffic figures

Compete's analysis of video traffic for April shows that Google (including both YouTube and the homegrown Google video) saw traffic jump 2.4 per cent over the month, giving them 50.4% of all video viewing sessions on the web. This is an incredible figure and makes the $1.5 billion in stock Google paid for YouTube, which was seen by many pundits as too much, look like the deal of the century.

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