Television is a social medium

This story from the Economist quotes a recent quantitative study into TV viewing habits which suggests that despite the rise of PVRs and online, on-demand video most people seem to want to watch TV at the time at which it is broadcast. It seems that people still really want TV to be a shared cultural experience, despite the fact that they love their PVRs and iPlayer, etc. In other words: television is a social medium. In fact, one of the odder things about this study is that most people greatly overstate the amount of timeshifted content they watch compared to the 'live' broadcast materia...

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Internet much more influential than TV and newspapers

Fascinating quantitative research from Fleishman Hillard and Harris Interactive confirms that the internet is now, by some margin, the medium that most influences our behaviour. In the UK the internet takes 42% of influence, TV 22%, radio 14%, newspapers 12% and magazines 9%. And while in the UK the internet still takes less of our time than TV (38% for TV and 30% for Internet), in France it takes more  (38% to internet and 35% to TV). This may just reflect the relative superiority of British public service broadcasting, however, the trend is clear. The report continues by breaking dow...

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Philips net tv – the problem with walled gardens

There's a race on at the moment among electronics manufacturers to bring web tv and video to the TV in your living room. Up until now, most solutions haven't been that impressive - there are lots of technical difficulties, not least of which is the profusion of technical standards. However, this may be about to change because it looks like Philips may have solved some of these issues with their new Net TV offering. But don't get too excited about this just yet, as there is, to my mind at least, one huge snag with the solution: the service is a walled garden featuring exclusive content f...

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