You Tube allows rights holders to ‘monetize’ mashups and fan videos

An interesting post on the Google blog discusses the latest in a seemingly unending line of 'synchronised dancing at your wedding' videos. Personally speaking, I'm a little tired of this particular meme, however, the video racked up over 10 million YouTube views in a few days, so I'm probably in the minority. Which is all very well, but what's interesting, however, is that You Tube now lets the rights holders, in this case Chris Brown's record company, monetize the video, i.e. serve ads over the video to Amazon downloads, etc. But does it work? Well according to Google it does. "In the ...

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A List Apart explains why you need a content strategy

Writing in A List Apart, Margot Bloomstein explains why you need a content strategy. Which is great, because it's something I've been talking about for several years, often to pretty sceptical audiences. Being a fellow content/digital strategist, I'd agree with almost everything Margot has to say, though I'd take the argument further. I believe that content strategy sits right at the heart of any organisation, brand or individual's communication strategy. Content is the way to reach audiences, particularly in an age where new social media channels are establishing themselves as important ...

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Lawrence Lessig discusses Google Book search and the ‘ecosystem’ of rights

Lawrence Lessig discusses Google Book search and the ecosystem of rights. In summary, he's very wary about Google's approach, contrasting it with the public library system, and suggesting that we may be unwittingly creating a restrictive and cumbersome system of rights which will stifle future academic and creative work. There's plenty to argue with in this presentation, in particular whether we want a private company, i.e. Google, effectively reframing our copyright laws.

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10 differing opinions on whether Rupert Murdoch can charge for internet news content

I'm aware that everyone's probably sick to the back teeth of the debate sparked by Rupert Murdoch's recent announcement that he was going to put all of News Corporation's Internet news sites behind a pay wall, but I thought for the sake of posterity I'd collect some of the more interesting opinions somewhere we can refer back to in a couple of years' time just to see who was right: 1. Mark Cuban - Advice for Rupert Murdoch Mark Cuban now owns an NFL team, but he made his name in Internet content, so he knows what he's talking about. Amongst other things, he thinks Murdoch can make money ...

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Rupert Murdoch to charge for access to all newspaper sites

Rupert Murdoch has just announced an end to free online newspaper content, an idea he first floated a couple of months back. All of his newspapers, from the Times to the Sun, will have paywalls within the year. Personally speaking, I think this is a mistake. It may be that lots of other newspapers follow his lead, however, there are sure to be a few that remain free-to-air, and they'll be the ones to prosper, along with the portals, the public service sites and other, "second tier" news providers. That's not to say I don't think you can charge for online content, you clearly can. The FT d...

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The relationship between advertising and content: part II

Faris Yakob, Head of Digital Strategy at McCann Erikson New York, discusses the democratistation of content (PDF) in Contagious Magazine. And while what he has to say about business models is interesting, it was the final paragraph that really caught my eye: "Advertising is about selling products – content is about, well, anything that makes people voluntarily spend time with it. This suggests we needs to take a long hard look at what we want ‘advertising’ to be. Either we continue to fund other people’s content or we begin to shift the emphasis in the industry. If we spent 80% of ...

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