Play Machinima Law

I've been following the goings-on at the Stanford Law's Play Machinima Law conference (well, I'm following the PML hashtag in Tweetdeck as there isn't much info on their website). For those that don't know, Machinima (a misspelled portmanteau of machine and cinema) uses 3D rendering engines and screenscrapes of in-game footage from Halo, WoW or the Sims, etc, which are then scripted and cut to make small films. Still confused? Then you should watch this: httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kb8rdc-0OpQ The first machinima, Diary of a Camper by United Rangers Films, appeared in 1996. By today...

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9 Arduino projects

Arduino is a physical computing platform based on a simple I/O board and a development environment that implements the Processing/Wiring language. In plain English, an Arduino is a gateway between the digital and physical worlds, a small electronics board that, along with some code allows you to create Twittering Plants, iPhone controlled cars, and whizzy light displays. Here are 9 of my favourite Arduino projects: Laser Harp httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLVXmsbVwUs Stephen Hobley's incredible Arduino-controlled laser harp. More information and schematics on this and other Arduino proje...

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Public service newspapers? Peter Preston advocates a license fee

Peter Preston, writing in today's Observer, is the latest in a long line of increasingly desperate journalists begging government to subsidise the newspaper industry. In Preston's case, he argues for a tax of around £50 p.a. on broadband connections. I'm not going to beat around the bush: the idea is ludicrous. Of course, as Preston points out, news reporting is an important component of a democratic society, however, the reality is that much of the 'news' in our newspapers is actually rewritten agency copy. All too often these days, the only value a newspaper's journalists add is their ...

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Is Bit.ly a replacement for Digg?

A fascinating post from Om Malik in which he argues that URL shortening service Bit.ly (a competitor to the more familiar Tiny URL) is in a position to launch a content recommendation service which can outcompete Digg. The argument can be summarised thusly: 1. Bit.ly shortens 25 million URLs per month; 2. it is therefore in a very good position to accurately measure what's popular on da Web; 3. this data could be converted into a Digg-like service. This seems possible, and the Bit.ly data would certainly be much harder to game than Digg. However, I think that misses the point of Digg, w...

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