Personal content overload

Rafe Needleman at Webware has personal content overload. And while Rafe is at the cutting edge of this stuff, the proliferation of personal content and services is something of a headache, even for later adopters. Interoperability is of course the answer: what I want to be able to do is aggregate and republish my feeds where ever I want. So that my friends on Facebook, which I dislike (Facebook, not my friends) can access content I've written on Twitter or my blog if I want them to. There are services which offer this functionality, however, I found Friend feed confusing and it's one...

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Linking out from content

Proof that news sites with external links are more engaging than those without. I suspect this open policy works because people want to see the best content, and they don't care whether or not you produced it. In other words, they value good filtering and recommendation over second rate proprietary content. via Publishing 2

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Crowdsourcing Art

Artist Aaron Koblin explains the Sheep Market which he created using Amazon's Mechanical Turk. Similarly employed to create a book about cats. While these are both interesting, the end results are pretty simple, however, how long will it be before a crowd creates art of real merit? (Cue debate about merit in art, etc.)

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Mozilla Ubiquity

Asa Raskin talks about Mozilla Ubiquity, which, in a nutshell, allows users to create mashups using natural language commands. It's still alpha and prototypical, however, if they get this to work in the way demonstrated, it will be an extremely powerful tool, and one which may eventually bring mashups into the mainstream.

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The Weekly Top 5: September 5, 2008

There follows an arbitrary and partial list of the five most interesting things I came across on the Internet this week. It is neither voted for, crowdsourced, comprehensive nor exhaustive. I hope you enjoy it nonetheless.  1. George Orwell's diaries A blog posting Orwell's diary entries on the same calendar day. This is a similar idea to the Pepys blog, however, what makes it interesting to my mind is that they're also plotting where he was on Google maps, which, to my mind at least, seems a little, well, Orwellian.  Big Brother it would seem is watching you even after you di...

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Google Chrome is really fast

O.K., this isn't about content, but I guess the beta launch of Chrome is the biggest news on the web for a while. I haven't had time for a full look, however, the most immediately obvious feature, and main 'take home point', is that it is really, really fast. The interface and feature set are a little rudimentary, however, I'm sure we'll soon see developer toolkits and the like, all of which will sit on top of their superfast engine. Chrome is undoubtedly serious competition for all concerned. Load times matter. Particularly for complex RIAs. It will be interesting to see how this imp...

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Philips net tv – the problem with walled gardens

There's a race on at the moment among electronics manufacturers to bring web tv and video to the TV in your living room. Up until now, most solutions haven't been that impressive - there are lots of technical difficulties, not least of which is the profusion of technical standards. However, this may be about to change because it looks like Philips may have solved some of these issues with their new Net TV offering. But don't get too excited about this just yet, as there is, to my mind at least, one huge snag with the solution: the service is a walled garden featuring exclusive content f...

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